Severe Storm Causes Flooding and Power Outages in California

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News Team

The second ‘atmospheric river’ to hit California in days caused widespread damage this Sunday in the northern part of the state. It flooded roads and caused power outages in thousands of homes. Top forecasters have warned that it will move slowly southward in the coming days, possibly with hurricane-force winds. The storm also downed trees and power lines in the San Francisco Bay area, where winds of up to 60 miles per hour (96 kilometers per hour) were reported. There were even gusts of 80 miles per hour in the mountainous area.

Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown anticipated that this storm is expected to be one of the largest and most important in the history of the county, and their goal is to overcome it without fatalities or serious injuries. The effects of this ‘atmospheric river’ began to be felt this Sunday afternoon. More than 200,000 customers were without power across the state, most of them in the north, according to poweroutage.us.

Meanwhile, Southern California was at risk of substantial flooding starting Sunday night due to how slow the system was moving. The core of the low-pressure system is very deep, moving very slowly and very close to us. That’s why we have such strong winds. And their slowness is what is causing the increased rainfall and the risk of flooding.

The storm, called ‘Pineapple Express’, a phenomenon caused by the humidity of the ‘atmospheric river’ which stretches across the Pacific to near Hawaii, reached Northern California on Saturday, when most of the state was under some type of warning for wind, waves or flooding. The ‘atmospheric rivers,’ which some also call ‘Pineapple Express’, are rain fronts that form in winter in the Pacific Ocean and can transport water equivalent to 15 times the flow of the Mississippi River.

The phone was ringing incessantly at the Santa Barbara Home Improvement Center. People asked about sandbags, flashlights, and generators. Bags of sand were sold out on Saturday, so customers were buying bags of potting soil and fertilizer instead. “People are trying to get anything that can be heavy to use, you know, as protection for their doors and everything,” said assistant director Lupita Vital.

Evacuation warnings and orders were in effect in Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Ventura, and Monterey counties, while classes were canceled Monday for schools throughout Santa Barbara County. Early Sunday, the National Weather Service issued a rare “hurricane wind warning” for the Central Coast, with wind gusts of up to 92 miles per hour from the Monterey Peninsula to the northern section of San Luis Obispo County. Rain forced organizers to postpone the final round of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am in Monterey County until Monday. The National Weather Service predicted up to six inches of precipitation in the coastal areas and valleys of Southern California, and up to 12 inches in the foothills and mountains. Forecasters predicted landslides, debris flows, and flooding.

It is the second time in days that California has been hit by an atmospheric river. The first reached San Francisco Bay on Wednesday, causing downpours and heavy snow that paralyzed cable car service before descending the coast. Another dangerous atmospheric river threatens Southern California: flooding and landslides are expected. The storm is expected to be one of the largest and most important in the history of the county, and their goal is to overcome it without fatalities or serious injuries. The effects of this ‘atmospheric river’ began to be felt this Sunday afternoon. More than 200,000 customers were without power across the state, most of them in the north, according to poweroutage.us. Meanwhile, Southern California was at risk of substantial flooding starting Sunday night due to how slow the system was moving. The core of the low-pressure system is very deep, moving very slowly and very close to us. That’s why we have such strong winds. And their slowness is what is causing the increased rainfall and the risk of flooding. The storm, called ‘Pineapple Express’, a phenomenon caused by the humidity of the ‘atmospheric river’ which stretches across the Pacific to near Hawaii, reached Northern California on Saturday, when most of the state was under some type of warning for wind, waves or flooding. The ‘atmospheric rivers,’ which some also call ‘Pineapple Express’, are rain fronts that form in winter in the Pacific Ocean and can transport water equivalent to 15 times the flow of the Mississippi River. The phone was ringing incessantly at the Santa Barbara Home Improvement Center. People asked about sandbags, flashlights, and generators. Bags of sand were sold out on Saturday, so customers were buying bags of potting soil and fertilizer instead. “People are trying to get anything that can be heavy to use, you know, as protection for their doors and everything,” said assistant director Lupita Vital. Evacuation warnings and orders were in effect in Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Ventura, and Monterey counties, while classes were canceled Monday for schools throughout Santa Barbara County. Early Sunday, the National Weather Service issued a rare “hurricane wind warning” for the Central Coast, with wind gusts of up to 92 miles per hour from the Monterey Peninsula to the northern section of San Luis Obispo County. Rain forced organizers to postpone the final round of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am in Monterey County until Monday. The National Weather Service predicted up to six inches of precipitation in the coastal areas and valleys of Southern California, and up to 12 inches in the foothills and mountains. Forecasters predicted landslides, debris flows, and flooding. It is the second time in days that California has been hit by an atmospheric river. The first reached San Francisco Bay on Wednesday, causing downpours and heavy snow that paralyzed cable car service before descending the coast. Another dangerous atmospheric river threatens Southern California: flooding and landslides are expected.

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