Highlighting The Climate Footprint of South American Superfoods Avocados and Blueberries

Highlighting The Climate Footprint of South American Superfoods Avocados and Blueberries

South American Superfood Industry Affects Both Communities and Environment

Matthias Ebert, a journalist, recently visited Peru and Chile to analyze the impacts of the “superfood” industry on communities and the environment. Avocados and blueberries, which are heavily consumed in Europe, require massive amounts of water for cultivation and generate high CO2 emissions when transported to other continents.

In Chile, avocado production has been increasing since the 1990s and is claimed to be the cause of water shortages in some areas. Similarly in Peru, blueberries are becoming a massive monoculture. Companies are seeking access to more water from the Andes to irrigate the arid and desert areas of agricultural production.

The agronomist Rodrigo Mundaca has been advocating for access to water as a basic right and public good as the Governor of the Valparaíso region. To produce one kilogram of avocados Рnearly three units Рup to 1000 liters of water is required. This amount is much higher than what is necessary for other fruits such as oranges and tomatoes.

DW Spanish will be airing a feature on the subject of South American avocados and blueberries – their nutritional benefits as well as their impacts on the environment and communities in their region – on the dates mentioned.

Elizabeth Taylor

Elizabeth Taylor is an accomplished journalist with a strong background in investigative reporting. She has covered a wide range of topics, from politics to business, and has a particular interest in uncovering stories that have a significant impact on the community.

Leave a Reply